zeldathemes
Snake Eater...
You're pretty good
Welp! Here I am. I like many things. RWBY, Adventure Time, Homestuck, Ava's Demon, Panty and Stocking, Evangelion, Dangan Ronpa, you name it. Message me if you want!
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87daysbefore:

image

pretty patties RULE!

cudl:

monstror:

reidsass:

friendly reminder to not be rude to picky eaters or make fun of them because some picky eaters are very insecure about being picky eaters and do not actually like being picky eaters!! and chances are theyre picky eaters for a reason!! which is important to them!! so please do not call them out or be rude about it!!

Who the heck cares

people with eating disorders and allergies and health problems and anxiety and autism care

mysoulisinorbit:

jemmasimmns:

please don’t make people with depression feel guilty for their lack of interest in things or their inability to motivate themselves please and thank you goodbye 

on that note, please don’t make people with anxiety feel guilty about their inability to do tasks you deem simple and literally call them children and tell them to grow up because of it

kat-whiskers-phan:

SIGNAL BOOST PLEASE

kat-whiskers-phan:

SIGNAL BOOST PLEASE

dadinspo:

do not put on sugar skull face paint for Halloween. I don’t care if one Mexican person said that’s its ok as long as you’re respectful. Stop only flowing PSA’s when its convenient to you and your cultural appropriation.

If you really want to wear sugar skull face paint, do it…

buttsosaurus:

gender-weird:

Why FCKH8 is NOT an Ally to the Queer Community
That time they made fun of asexuality and diversity of the queer community in one fell swoop
That time they became hypocrites about it to avoid being called acephobic (not to mention cissexist/ not trans* inclusive)
That time they used misogyny to empower cis gay men, alienate lesbians, forget about bisexuality, and be cissexist about all forms of sexuality
That time they stole ideas from queer charities to make a profit
That time they stole ideas from bloggers to make a profit
That time reviews show just how shitty they are at doing business anways
That time they paralleled racial segregation to the gay rights movement because they are definitely the same thing
That time they used stereotypes of Black women to render them into props
That time they ignored gender neutral pronouns, cited religion as a reason for doing so, and harassed someone over it
Basically all of the stuff folks are reporting on this tumblr I keep linking ya’ll to
They harass and disrespect people on their facebook page. They are actively cissexist, transphobic, asexual erasing, racist, sexist, and misogynist in order to sell shitty, overpriced t-shirts that they stole from charities. 
So in other words, fuck fckh8.
(I understand that a lot of parodies of fckh8 have recently appeared on tumblr and other social network websites. As far as I am aware none of the links I have posted above are parodies, and are actually associated with fckh8. 
If you notice any disparities, please let me know.)

friendly reminder that this is more reasons why you should not be a fan of fckh8 and the more i look at the tag the more bullshit by them appears

buttsosaurus:

gender-weird:

Why FCKH8 is NOT an Ally to the Queer Community

They harass and disrespect people on their facebook page. They are actively cissexist, transphobic, asexual erasing, racist, sexist, and misogynist in order to sell shitty, overpriced t-shirts that they stole from charities. 

So in other words, fuck fckh8.

(I understand that a lot of parodies of fckh8 have recently appeared on tumblr and other social network websites. As far as I am aware none of the links I have posted above are parodies, and are actually associated with fckh8. 

If you notice any disparities, please let me know.)

friendly reminder that this is more reasons why you should not be a fan of fckh8 and the more i look at the tag the more bullshit by them appears

default album art
Song: bless
Artist: Arnor Dan
Album: TVアニメ「残響のテロル」オリジナルサウンドトラック
Played: 5,772 times.

npdtsukishima:

npdtsukishima:

pls talk about all personality disorders All of them seriously 

Not just cluster a not just cluster b or c not just the ones you find sympathetic or easy to stomach or even just the ones you have Talk About All Of Them and give them All equal recognition and attention

becomingwonder-woman:

I think learning to say “She’s beautiful and I am also beautiful” is really important. So many times we just compare and contrast ourselves against other people but it doesn’t need to be like that.

let’s talk about the physical affects of chronic anxiety because they’re hardly ever acknowledged

little-smoochie-owl:

baby-snakes:

tombtea:

  • upset stomach and vomiting
  • ulcers
  • muscle aches
  • chronic fatigue
  • hormonal problems
  • irregular menstrual cycles
  • insomnia
  • infections
  • lowered immune system
  • migraines
  • shortness of breath
  • dizziness
  • heart palpitations
  • teeth-grinding
  • rashes

it is a lot more than just “feeling anxious “

thank you.

default album art
Song: Promise - The idolm@ster TV version
Played: 98 times.
thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

karate-and-friendship:

Spot the difference.

grinderman2:

if i had money i would dress so on point all the time… i would even theme my outfits based on my emotion of the day like “cold war-era paranoia” or “realizing that you are not an exception”